For all the protesters out there:

pon-raul:

If you aren’t aware, cops love to destroy the phones of people who record them. 

So next time you’re in a situation where you are recording an officer and fear for the safety of your video evidence, try using the Bambuser app.

It uploads your video online to your Bambuser account while you record it. You can also stream the video live. This way your videos are saved online, safe from the hands of the uniformed pigs. 

(via cognitivedissonance)

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Amnesty International is best known for monitoring human rights conditions in places like Afghanistan and China—while active in the United States, it rarely makes headlines here. That’s why the sight of yellow-clad Amnesty activists walking the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, is attracting so much attention: It marks the first time an Amnesty delegation has been dispatched to monitor a human rights crisis unfolding on American soil.

Margaret Huang, deputy executive director of campaigns and programs for Amnesty USA, was in Ferguson earlier this week for what she called a “support mission” and says that Amnesty came at the request of the community. Huang and her colleagues did field trainings to educate protesters on their rights and how to respond to police. “The goal was not necessarily to produce a report, which is what Amnesty has typically done, but just to make sure things have been examined from a human rights angle and for people to understand international legal obligations,” Huang says. She says the response from the community has been overwhelmingly positive; the police, however, haven’t been as welcoming. On Monday night, police forced Amnesty observers out of the protest area at gunpoint.

Amnesty began reporting on human rights in the United States in 1998, and it has since become just as vocal about conditions here as it is elsewhere. The organization’s 2013 report on the US is a laundry list of alleged human rights transgressions, including solitary confinement, detention of prisoners in Afghanistan and Guantanamo, drone strikes, and police brutality. This tweet about the situation in Ferguson sums up the organization’s angle:

While the nature of Amnesty’s mission in Ferguson is unprecedented in the United States, it’s not the first time delegations have been on the ground in times of crisis. After Hurricane Katrina hit, teams went to New Orleans to interview residents, with the purpose of producing a report detailing how government was failing in its recovery efforts. Amnesty also helped organize protests and raise awareness leading up to Troy Davis’ execution in 2011.

To find the closest parallel to what Amnesty is doing in Missouri, though, you have to look abroad. Huang says that Amnesty’s work during Turkey’s massive anti-government protests in 2013 most resembles the Ferguson mission. In Istanbul, activists gave medical assistance to injured protesters and observed the violent clashes involving protesters, police, and sometimes members of the press. They ultimately produced a huge report detailing the numerous human rights abuses carried out by Turkish police. Their concerns then—police brutality, harassment and detainment of the press—were also articulated in a statement about Ferguson.

What’s happening in Ferguson and what happened across Turkey last year aren’t the same, of course. But the similarities between the two situations—and the fact that Amnesty is in Ferguson in the first place—are, for many, making what’s unfolding now even more troubling. Huang didn’t say how long the delegation plans to stay in Ferguson, calling the situation “very fluid,” but Amnesty USA’s executive director, Steven Hawkins, is there now.

Source: Sam Brodey for Mother Jones

(via blackfeminism)

"Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue."

Armed police: Trigger happy | The Economist (via kenyatta)

(via cognitivedissonance)

"The overall result of these efforts is to increase the police role in the community, meaning that the coercive apparatus of the state will be more involved with daily life. The state, and the police in particular, will have more opportunities for surveillance, and can exercise control in a variety of ways besides arrests, citations, or physical force. This shift can be made to sound like demilitarization, liberalization, or democratization, but it is instead just a smarter approach to repression. The goal of community policing is to reduce resistance before force is required."

our enemies in blue (via becoming-vverevvolf)

(via bedabbathandbeyond)

"

Fines were in fact imposed only when the killing of a slave was discovered and prosecuted (as we will see more fully), although excessive cruelty on a plantation could tarnish the reputation of an owner or manager. Still, when the governor proposed in 1762 that something more than a fine be instituted for beating a slave to death, the councilors on the Court of Policy and Criminal Justice, all of them plantation owners, demurred:

"Although no owner should ever arrogate the power over life and death over his slaves, it is nonetheless of the utmost importance that slaves should continue to believe that their masters possess that power. There would be no keeping them under control if they were aware that their masters could receive corporal punishment or be executed for beating a slave to death." The law remained as it was.

"

— Natalie Zemon Davis, Judges, Masters, Diviners: Slaves’ Experience of Criminal Justice in Colonial Suriname (via processedlives)

(via blackfeminism)

baeddelpherneliatakesthesquare:

Defend the protesters in Ferguson when they peacefully protest.
Defend the protesters in Ferguson when they riot.

(via dorkstranger)

Anonymous said: Who are you getting your Ferguson information from? I'm having problems verifying what's actually happening!

wearesynchronizednowandforever:

That’s actually what’s taking me so long to update some of my posts; not only is the information surfacing slowly about his case specifically, but I make sure to cross reference at least three sources because some people are just blatantly lying to stir shit up.

Also live feeds keep going down and new ones pop back up but I know some of you are sensitive to video, so

Here’s a list of some twitter handles:

Journalists (All of these are either on the ground in Ferguson as I type this or actively covering events in Ferguson, both Brown’s case and the rallies):

Residents/Legislature/Other:

Instagram Accounts: (TW: Some of these accounts feature graphic video or images of Ferguson events)

Tumblr Accounts:

I’m sure I forgot a bunch but here’s a start. I’ll update it periodically and reblog. Some of it is compilations from a bunch of sources, some is original content. Disclaimer: I’m not vouching for any other content on any of these blogs/twitters/instagrams or any that may be posted after this list but as of right now, the information regarding Ferguson and discussions taking place about the rallies/police and Mike Brown’s death seems accurate.

if you want to be included on any of these lists, shoot me a message with your web-address and I’ll check it out

You will find everything I’ve posted under tagged/ferguson, tagged/police-brutality or tagged/michael-brown

kropotkindersurprise:

Two ways of dealing with tear gas grenades from comrades in Turkey: Either submerge them in water. Make sure you can close off the container cause the gas will still spread for a while. Or throw them in the fire so the gas burns off before it can spread.

(via leftbeef)

werewolfau:

At a deposition, Ferguson’s former police chief revealed that his staff did not keep records of incidents in which officers used force against citizens, so long as no one died; in other words, there was no way of telling how often incidents like Davis’ happened.

remember shit like this when they talk about how mike brown’s shooter had no disciplinary record

(via shitrichcollegekidssay)

when people say shit like THIS IS AMERICA??? in regards to police brutality against black folks

marfmellow:

Like what the fuck do you think this place was founded upon? THE GENOCIDE OF BLACK PEOPLE.

THE GENOCIDE OF BLACK PEOPLE.
THE GENOCIDE OF BLACK PEOPLE.
THE GENOCIDE OF BLACK PEOPLE.
THE GENOCIDE OF BLACK PEOPLE.

(via blackfeminism)